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Various - The Prodigal Audio Samples Available

The Prodigal by Various

Cross Rhythms Rating: 5/10
CD: Album
Tags: Pop, CD, Album
Normal Dispatch Time: 1-5 days
An album of songs that reinterpret one of Jesus' best-known parables for the Church of today.

Condition: Used - Very Good

A well-cared-for item which may show limited signs of wear or creasing, but without obvious major defects. Please note that Cross Rhythms do not test that used items play correctly, and we do not check the condition of discs and liner notes. If you are not satisfied with the condition of your purchase please contact customer services.

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PLAY ALL STOP
  1. 1. Prodigal Son Suite Overture
  2. 2. Prodigal Son Suite Part 1
  3. 3. Prodigal Son Suite Part 2
  4. 4. Prodigal Son Suite Part 3
  5. 5. Prodigal Son Suite Finale
  6. 6. Prodigal
  7. 7. Home
  8. 8. When The Tears No Longer Come
  9. 9. Even If You Never Come Back Home
  10. 10. Found
  11. 11. A Million Miles
  12. 12. I Will Return-Arms Of Love
  13. 13. Father Me
  14. 14. Song For The Prodigals
This track data is supplied by the Cross Rhythms review library. Please note that CD/DVD tracks may vary according to release region or product version. You should not assume that products purchased through Cross Rhythms Direct will necessarily have identical track listings to those shown.
5/10

Reviewed by Chris Tozer

In his all too brief ministry the late great Keith Green left us with a catalogue of amazing songs that have stood up well since his untimely death over 25 years ago, as numerous tributes have proved. But even the greatest songwriters have their off days and to my mind the original recording of "The Prodigal Suite" would never have sold so well without Green's name on the sleeve. He was always more the Brill Building/Tin Pan Alley tunesmith than the singer/songwriter of the folk tradition. Like Elton John his strength lay in catchy hooks and short snappy songs that told it like it is in three minutes. But thematic albums from Sergeant Pepper to Tommy were norm for grown up musicians back then and for Green it was a natural progression but, in retrospect, can be viewed as a bridge too far. Put simply, there are no memorable songs here. Clearly the widely experienced British producer would beg to differ and has assembled a capable line-up of musicians to re-record the Suite. But, as there is no information about who sings or plays what, the anonymity adds to the sense of blandness. The writers of the songs tagged on after the Suite get better treatment so we know there are contributions from established writers of the likes of Brian Doerksen as well as lesser-known folk such as Mark Dunn and Daniel and Emily Norton. But, even the inclusion of an insipid arrangement of Graham Kendrick's classic "Father Me" adds little. The parable of the prodigal son exudes feelings of coveted-ness, hedonism, squalor, dejection, jealousy, forgiveness and much, much more. No wonder that is second only to that of the Good Samaritan in term of cultural impact across the western world. You simply don't show these feelings by just writing in a minor key. Such an incredible story deserves better treatment. Visual artists across the centuries have managed it - including Charles MacKay who provided a brilliant painting for the album. The truth remains that you can't judge a book by the cover.

Style: Pop
Cross Rhythms Product Code: 14754
Product Format: CD
Content Type: Album
Cat. Code: Authentic 8203882
Items: 1
Release Date: 2005

An album of songs that reinterpret one of Jesus' best-known parables for the Church of today.

Posted by Trevor in Stoke-on-Trent, England at 10:15 on May 24 2006

I have to confess that I was a little disappointed overall by the album, but 'A Million Miles' by Brent Miller is a good song ......















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